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Antiwar Interview: Kinsella on Bill of Rights, Intellectual Property

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Antiwar Radio: Stephan Kinsella

Antiwar Radio: Stephan Kinsella

Posted by Scott in February 11th, 2010

Stephan Kinsella, fellow at the Mises Institute and author of the book Against Intellectual Property [.pdf], discusses the federal government’s appropriation of the Bill of Rights – through the 14th Amendment – to regulate state powers, the debate about whether current lawlessness can rightfully be blamed on deviation from the beneficent Constitution or if the problem lies in the deeply flawed document itself and why ideas can’t be property.

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  • Jayel Aheram February 14, 2010, 12:45 pm

    Question!

    How about the labor that was put into the arrangement? In the digital era, where copies can be made using minimal resources, it is the labor and time that is the most “expensive” part of the creation. Do we have rights to that labor?

    I suppose you can argue that in things digital and online, it is the bandwidth that is the scarce resource that is appropriated when someone makes a copy directly from the original content creator’s server. Though, that argument would only apply to specific situations where copies are made from the source server. Once a “legal copy” has been made, there is not an ethical argument that can be made against people who willingly allocate their bandwidth to share their “legal copy” with thousands of people through BitTorrent. The source server is bypassed altogether.

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