≡ Menu

Laserinterview re IP-2006

Laserinterview med Stephan Kinsella (Interview/Chat Forum on IP topics), Danish libertarian site, Sept. 15, 2006

***

Den 15. september 2006
Læserinterview med Stephan Kinsella
“The most fundamental problem is that intellectual property amounts to assigning property rights in already existing tangible property to non-producers. It dilutes real property rights.”

Af Redaktionen

Den 13. september besøgte Stephan Kinsella Liberators chat for at diskutere intellektuel ejendomsret. Stephan kom allerede tidligt på aftenen, så chattens stambrugere fik en libertariansk hyggesludder med ham før selve debatten.

Chatten blev annonceret på Mises og LewRockwell blog, hvorfor der også var amerikanere tilstede, bl.a. Jeremy Sapienza.

Vi takker Stephan Kinsella for at holde en time fri fra arbejdet for at svare på spørgsmål fra Liberators læsere.

Her følger læsernes debat med Stephan Kinsella i let redigeret form:

Kinsella Godaften everybody!

Ordstyrer Welcome to the Liberator chat. My name is Daniel Beattie, and I will be your moderator tonight.
Our guest is N. Stephan Kinsella, adjunct scholar of the Mises Institute, blogger at LewRockwell.com and former Book Review Editor of the Mises Institute’s Journal of Libertarian Studies. Stephan is a practicing intellectual property attorney and general counsel of Applied Optoelectronics, Inc.
Tonight’s topic is libertarianism and intellectual property. Stephan is known to be an avid opponent of intellectual property rights and he has written several articles and essays on the subject.
When you want to ask Stephan a question, double-click Ordstyrer in the user list to the right and type your question in the new window that appears. I will then pass on questions to Stephan here in the main chat.
Welcome and thank you for joining us Stephan.

Kinsella Welcome

Ordstyrer Could you please begin with a few words about why you don’t see intellectual property rights as compatible with the negative libertarian rights?

Kinsella The basic reason is that after starting to practice IP law, and seeing holes in Rand’s justification, I kept searching and failed, and finally realized why first, most defenses of IP are unprinipled and utilitarian. I am an Austrian so have problems with utilitarian reasoning of this type.
And finally, the most fundamental problem is that IP amounts to assigning property rights in already-existing tangible property to non-producers. It dilutes real property rights.
Further, IP seems to necessarily be a creature of legislation–of the state; and is inherently vague and arbitrary. We are seeing this now.

Ordstyrer We have the first question, are you ready for the questions?

Kinsella ja

Ordstyrer LBO: In Against Intellectual Property you write about contractual IP that bookseller A may contract with bookbuyer B that he cannot copy or resell the book, but A cannot keep C, who did not enter the contract but happens to hear the plot of the book, from selling a book with that plot. But can A not contract with B that B must make sure that noone else sees B’s book or hear about the plot from him?

Kinsella Well, A may enter into a contract wtih B that prohibits B from doing certain things with the book. I think you can look at this two ways. First, the book is sold to B, but B agrees to conditionally pay monetary damages to A *if* B does certain things with the book (like shows it to others). Or, you could say the book is co-owned and that B has only limitd rights to use it; so if he shows it to someone else, it’s trespass.
But in either case, B either has to pay money to A, or can be punished by A. It does not imply that C may not use the *information* he obtained from B, since information is not property.
This is the missing link in Rothbard’s theory: you have to assume information is property, to make the contract IP work; but information is not property. Unlike a stolen watch, say.

Kinsella Make sense?

Ordstyrer Yes. The  defence for intellectual property rights that I have heard most often, is that the writer, or musician or what not, has produced an original piece of work, and that this doesn’t differ from other property. And that he deserves to be rewarded for his work, just as every other person that produces something. What is your opinion on this?

Kinsella Right. I see a few problems with this. First, it does differ, in a couple of respects. If i find an unused thing and appropriate it, it does not affect your use of your own already-existing property. However, if I am granted an IP right, it gives me a right to control how you use your property. That is one difference.
Another problem is that this view relies on either the reward, or creation, theory of property rights. Each has problems: the reward theory is just utlitarian or wealth-maximization, and not principled. Plus there is no ending point; you might argue using this reasoning for tax dollars to fund innovation if the monopoly reward is not “enough” (some actually argue this — I can give links if needed)
And the creation idea is a main confusion I think for Randian and rights or principled types: the problem with it is that creation is not realy an indendent source of property rights; it is neither necessary nor sufficient. Think of it this way: if you take my metal and make a sword out of it, you create the sword, but you don’t own it. Creation is not sufficient. Conversely, if I find unused metal, and fashion a sword out of it, I own the sword because I owned the metal already–creation is not necessary.

Ordstyrer LHV: What is the main argument – in your opinion – that information is not property. Is it information’s non-materiality, or is it that it can be copied endlessly without depleting the source, so to speak?

Kinsella I think really, ownership of scarce resources can be established based on first use (appropriation), and based on contratual transfer from a previous owner. There is no other way, really. Yes, the main argument is that information is not a rivalrous or scarce resource. And–and this is implied by this–this means that granting rights in it necessarily restricts or invades rights in all other property.
Moreoever, there is a utilitarian concern, of a sort: there is no coherent or objective boundary or stopping point; and if you take this seriously, and implemented it, the human race woudl die out since we would not be able to use any tangible things becuase we could never obtain enough permissions.

Ordstyrer LBO: You write about trademarks that the consumers’ rights are violated if a company pretends to be another company by having the same name. But what if the fraud company claims not to be fooling it’s customers, but just happens to come up with the same name and concept as the original company? Doesn’t the fraud company has as much right to use its tangible property for a concept and a name as the original company?

Kinsella Probably, yes. Then it is just  a factual question as to the nature of the understanding shared by the parties to a given transaction. Fraud is an intentional crime, after all. And the principle of caveat emptor–buyer beware–would apply.

Ordstyrer LHV: But ‘good’ information certainly is a scarce resource? Ideas might be shared by everyone, but not everyone can come up with a good idea.

Kinsella (I found the link for the post that discusses various proposals to actually have governemnt tax payer awards of innovation: http://blog.mises.org/blog/archives/003229.asp )
I think the use of the word “scarce” causes some problems; it makes IP advocates think the opponent is not recognizing the value of men’s mind or mental effort. But this is not true. The word scarcity in this context is jsut a special economic term, it really means rivalrous.
Good ideas might be “rare” and hard to come up with, but that does not mean that information itself is a rivalrous or scarce good: its use by any number of people does not deprive its use by others. It’s just a recipe, really–ideas, knowledge, or information. The idea that we can own ideas is really absurd, if you think about it. In my opinion, anyway.

Ordstyrer LBO: Even though you are not an utilitarian, do you know of any convincing utilitarian arguments against IP?

Kinsella Well, as I noted, if you had a principled set of IP laws, human survival would be impossible. I think that’s a pretty good utilitarian argument against IP– because it shows that the only type of IP system we could ever favor is one with arbitrary rules, and those can never therefore be just. But in addition, from my experience, there is not a single study that concludes that even in utilitarian terms the system is worth it. And most advocates do not really even try or care. So all we know is: the system has costs; and it has some apparent benefits; and no one konws if the latter are greater than teh former. So what is the justification to bear the cost?
(For one patent attorney’s “empirical” or experiential take on this, see this letter I posted recently: http://blog.mises.org/archives/005580.asp )

Ordstyrer Another classic in the IP debate, is that medicine would not be produced as we know it, since the testing and development is so expensive, that without patents it would not be possible to produce new medicin, and hence they would not be produced. What is your opinion on this?

Kinsella
Well, it does seem that the case of pharmaceuticals is perhaps oneof the strongest–or least weak–of the utilitarian cases for IP. But note, it is clearly utilitarian. My view is that (a) there has always been medical progress, and still would be, even without patents; and (b) the regulatory process (FDA approval) imposes costs too.
so: re (a): you cannot argue there will be NO medical progress, only “less” medical progress, without IP/patents. But again, if this is the standard, what in principle is wrong with just having tax payer dollars paid to “reward” innovators so that there is “enough” progress (assuming we can know this–why not try to achieve the optimal amoutn?). re (b): if you abolish the FDA and patents, drug companies would see lowered costs and quicker access to market, but also more competition. But at least removing the FDA regs would blunt the effects of pharmaceuticals.

Ordstyrer LBO: What do you think about the argument against IP that the will and mind is unalienable, and therefore if you have heard of an idea or a book plot, you cannot be forbidden to tell it to others?

Kinsella Well, this is I think not really necessary–simpler arguments are available, but there is a grain of truth in this comment. Even the otherwise abhorrent Tom Palmer (who is good on this issue) makes a good point along these lines: see p. 37 of my Against IP paper: http://www.mises.org/journals/jls/15_2/15_2_1.pdf
He points out that it would make no sense to say you are prohibited from “remembering’ something, “The separation and retention of the right to copy from the bundle of rights that we call property is proble matic. Could one reserve the right, for example, to remember something? Suppose that I wrote a book and offered it to you to read, but I had retained one right: the right to remember it. Would I be justified in taking you to court?
I would like to emphasize, as an aside, that I am all in favor of Carlsberg beer retaining its trademark and trade secret. 🙂

Ordstyrer LHV: But clearly copyright infringement on entertainment material (movies/music) is costing the entertainment industry a lot of money, not only theoretically but in practice. There might be movies anyway, and there might not, but with digital technology coming on strong, there certainly seems to be very heavy utilitarian arguments for IP here – even though the actual system might be flawed.

Kinsella Yes, I agree, the apparent costs (or lack of benefit) of a copyright system seem to be more noticeable or pronounced, in a digital world; but likewise, the costs of having the system are mroe apparently too: for example the enforcement mechanisms have become more and more draconian; e.g., in the US, the Digital Millenium Copyright Act, which actually outlaws the sale of devices designed to circumvent copy encryption schemes, EVEN if that circumvention is legal!
Moreover, notice: what are we all here doing? we are right now spending our time and effort to produce copyightable works (these words), without any real expecttation or care that we will be able to prevent ripoffs. The layout of the world will be different in one universe than another; and there will alwyas be visible transition effects and costs of moving from one to the other. This is perhaps one reason for inertia or resistance to change.
One more point: when libertarians grant that the system is flawed, it’s as if they concede particular cases of injustice I might point out. But when I ask them waht they are in favor of, they usually have no answer, saying that they are not IP experts. So it’s like these theists who say they believe in God but that he is undefinable so they realy don’t know what t hey believe in!

Ordstyrer Barnett: If I pass myself of as Kinsella and write books of significantly inferior quality under his name, thus destroying his hard-earned reputation, would this not be an argument in favor of the intellectual property right of owning my own name?

Kinsella Well le’ts clarify IP rights here.  Strictly speaking you are talking of some kind of trademark or reputation right. Not really a copyright. Most of my fire is directed at the big culprits: patent and copyright. As I have noted, there is a core of legitimacy to some forms of trademark: fraud.
So, suppose you took Aristotle’s The Republic (okay, I’m joking, I know it’s realy Socrates) — and published it as Joe Dane’s Republic. You are not harming Plato. You are just making a laughingstock out of yourself. Moreover, I think this problem is always marginal: no serious person or businessman ever starts out to make a real reputation or success by imitating others. Look, it is legal now to pretend you are Plato. But no one does it–why?
I would say this: if you use my name to get access to my bank accoun,t say, you are committing theft of my money, because you do not have my consent to it. So in this sense, ID theft is a type of crime. And you could be defrauding your customers if you use the wrong name. BUt it dose not violate my rights. I think Hoppe’s comments are apropos here: to defend a right to reputation is a defense of what others believe, and/or a view that property rights are to values, not to things: See pp. 139-41 of Hoppe’s TSC: http://www.hanshoppe.com/publications.php#soc-cap for his remarks on value and property rights. Too long to quote here.

Ordstyrer JanMadsen: Could you elaborate on the different costs of IPR? I assume patent races is one of them.

Kinsella You mean races to get a filing date?  I don’t see that as a big cost, really. Not directly. At least in the US, we have a first to invent, not a first to file, system, anyway.
The costs are varied and huge. I think it’s hard to estimate but a good rough estimate might be to simply look at the costs of filing fees paid to the patent office, patent attorney salaries and fees, and related costs (such as translation costs), plus the costs of paying patent litigators in defense (millions per action) plus higher insurance costs.
Then, there are other costs (Julio Cole, I believe, points out many of these, as do Boldren and Levine–see http://www.stephankinsella.com/ip/
But other costs are skewing research away from theoretical or fundamental research and toward the production of practical gizmos. And consider this kind of practice: HP makes its money from selling INK for its laserprinters, right? So what does it do? It has tons of patentable small innovations that protect some cartridge-ink system. It does this so that it can prevent people from making cartridges compatible with its printers. It’s just tying a patent to a device so that they can monopolize their ink. etc.
This is costly, surely. There are many others. See the papers by Cole; and Levine-boldrin on my page for more ideas about the costs.
One other cost I could mention: reduced production or competition *because* several small-medium size companies are *afraid* to even enter a given field, for fear of being sued they just find something else to do.

Ordstyrer I believe that this was the last question. Thanks, Stephan, for taking time to come to talk to us here at the liberator-chat.

Kinsella You are welcome! Good night!


Lagt på Liberator den 15. september 2006

Af Redaktionen
Email: redaktion@liberator.dk



Indsat af Exodus
Email: din@email.dk
Interessant men en smule ensidigt. F.eks. skal man være meget stærk i troen for at mene at markedet selv vil sikre den nødvendige test af medicin før det slipper ud til brug i en ren markedsmodel. Vi har i hvert fald et par rigtigt grimme eksempler og forbrugerne kan næppe se forskel.

Jeg savner også spørgsmålet om personrelaterede data, som absolut må sige at være og bør være en knap ressource idet det både udgør en risiko for personen og udgør en problem for Hr. Mises teorier om markedsdannelse.


Indsat af David B. Karsbøl
Email: dbk@libertas.dk
Hej Exodus

Du skriver:

Interessant men en smule ensidigt. F.eks. skal man være meget stærk i troen for at mene at markedet selv vil sikre den nødvendige test af medicin før det slipper ud til brug i en ren markedsmodel.

Det er vel et spørgsmål erstatningsansvar. Et medicinalselskab, som skal erstatte skader fra utilstrækkeligt testet medicin, vil være tilbageholdende med at løsgive medicinen, inden det er sikkert på, at der ikke er utilsigtede bivirkninger.

Problemet i dag er desuden i mange af verdens lande, at hvis blot virksomhederne lever op til de statslige sundhedsbureaukratier, bortfalder erstatningsansvar helt eller delvis. Derved mindskes også incitamentet til at afprøve medicinen tilstrækkeligt grundigt.

mvh

David


Indsat af JH
Email: din@email.dk
David,

Marginalomkostninger for de fleste farmaceutiske produkter er lig nul og det at kopiere et produkt er ekstremt nemt og billigt sammenlignet med original forskning, udvikling, testing ogsaa selvom det udelukkende er for at slippe for erstatningskrav.

Der er derfor intet oekonomisk incitatment til at invistere 1 mia.$ i et nyt produkt, hvis du ugen efter lanceringen har ti lignende produkter paa markedet. Og nej first moover er ikke tilstraekkeligt.


Indsat af JH
Email: din@email.dk
David,

Marginalomkostninger for de fleste farmaceutiske produkter er lig nul og det at kopiere et produkt er ekstremt nemt og billigt sammenlignet med original forskning, udvikling, testing ogsaa selvom det udelukkende er for at slippe for erstatningskrav.

Der er derfor intet oekonomisk incitatment til at invistere 1 mia.$ i et nyt produkt, hvis du ugen efter lanceringen har ti lignende produkter paa markedet. Og nej first moover er ikke tilstraekkeligt.


Indsat af Kjeld Flarup
Email: din@email.dk
Angående medicin, så kan man jo som udgangspunkt holde indholdet hemmeligt. Hvis der så f.eks. er nogle som vil se recepten, så som offentlige myndigheder, så må disse jo garantere at recepten holdes hemmelig!

Indsat af Kjeld
Email: din@email.dk
Det er ingen sag at duplikere et medicinsk produkt, udfra en relativ simpel analyse af selve produktet.

Der kan dog vaere en hvis maengde proces-innovation i forbindelse med selve produktionen, som kan holdes hemmelig og som giver enkelte producenter en lille konkurrencemaessig fordel. Men de der “opfinder” selve produktet, behoever ikke noedvendigvis ogsaa besidde den mest effektive produktionsmetode. Desuden er produktionsomkostningerne som sagt stort set lig nul og derfor er fordellen som sagt meget lille.

Altsaa: Ingen behoever en recept udover patienten, som skal hente sin laegeordinerede medicin.


Indsat af Peter Garnry
Email: din@email.dk
Til JH,

Medicinalvirksomhederne har måske marginaleomkostninger på 0,25 kr. pr. pille og hvad så? Sådan som jeg hører dig, så forsvarer du statens patentsystem, der giver medicinalvirksomheder monopol på produktion og salg af medicin i en given periode (10-20 år). Er det samfundsefficient? Hvis vi anvender din retorik, så er det, da alternativet ville være, at ingen medicinalproducenter ville løbe risikoen for at deres nye produkt ville blive kopieret indenfor en uge – dit eksempel er absurd og naiv, samt uden kobling til hvordan markedet ville regulere ressourcerne.

Påbegyndelsen af en ny pille er ligesom så mange andre investeringsprojekter en investering, der vil generere et givent cashflow over tid, der derfor skal tilbagediskonteres med en given kalkulationsrente, der er en afvejning af risiko, inflation, skat og tidspreference (renten). På et frit og ureguleret marked vil kun medicin hvis kapitalværdi er positiv med den givne kalkulationsrente blive påfundet og produceret. Tilhængeren af regulerede markeder ville straks sige, at intet nyt medicin ville blive opfundet. Jeg kan kun sige, at hvis det er tilfældet – hvad så? Det eneste vi kan konkludere er blot, at så er markedet for medicin skruet sådan sammen, at ressourcerne bedst placeres andre steder i økonomien. Dette ville dog næppe være tilfældet i den virkelige verden. Dette skyldes flere ting.

1. Din tidsramme for kopiering af medicin er overdrevet, hvilket du ville se, hvis du så lidt i regnskaberne for Novartis, der er verdens største producent af kopimedicin.

2. Derudover vil firstmover give fordele på kort sigt (1-2 år).

H. Lundbeck (lille virksomhed i industrien) genererede med deres nye medicin Cipralex ca. 2,2 mia. kr. i 2005 på det europæiske marked. Produktet blev lanceret i 2003. Det vil sige på tre år genererer dette middel allerede over 2 mia. kr. i indtægter til Lundbeck og tænk hvor små de er – samlet over den 3 årige periode tror jeg indtægterne har væert ca. 3-3,5 mia. kr. Tænk på hvor meget Pfizer”s nye produkter kan generere på 3 år. Disse indtægter er så høje grundet deres monopolstatus som staten opretholder – ROA ca. 33%, ROE ca. 23%, hvorfor ROIC måske er 29% (ej opgivet, men deres finansielle gearing er skruet sådan sammen, at ROIC i dette tilfælde er højere end ROE). Disse afkast er dobbelt så høje som det gennemsnitlige industrielle afkast af kapitalen siden 1970″erne i USA. Det er derfor naturligt at antage at konkurrence efter noget tid (1-2 år) fra kopiproducenter vil presse disse marginer nedad, men dette ville ikke betyde at al produktion af medicin ville stoppe. Dette ville afhænge af mange faktorer som alle ville blive inkorporeret i kalkulationsrenten. Og hvis kapitalværdien så bliver negativ givet risikoen for konkurrence fra kopiproducenter og andre faktorer, ja så bliver medicinen ikke opfundet. Og ja det kunne være medicin mod en bestemt type kræft eller gigt. Men pointen er at ressourcerne i samfundet er bedst allokeret hvis markedet får lov at styre – dette ville kunne udskyde vigtig medicin i 10 år. Alternativt bliver kapitalen blot dirigeret over i andre sektoren, hvor den skaber mere værdi. Dette kunne være vandforsyning eller udgravning efter Kul eller boring efter olien i Nordsøen.


Indsat af JH
Email: din@email.dk
Peter Garny,

Du har ret i at en fjernelse af patentordningen vil gøre det mindre attraktivt at investere i medicinudvikling, og derfor vil midler flyttes til mere lukrative investeringer. Klart nok.

Hvis du er ligeglad med om der udvikles ny medicin, saa er det fair nok at ville fjerne alt patentbeskyttelse. Da vil den eksisterende medicin blive billigere. Klart nok.

Dine ovrige betragninger er i bedste fald baseret paa uvidenhed.

1)Man kan ikke se isoleret paa et enkelt succesprodukt. Du er noedt til at inddrage hele virksomheden pipeline af mislykket projekter som ogsaa skal finansieres af de faa ”blockbusters”. Hvis du mindsker indtjenings potentialet for den enkelte blockbuster, saa fjerner du grundlaget for en stor del af den medicinske udvikling.

2) Novartis er jo netop producent af medicin efter at patentet er udloebet. Sammenligningen er derfor ikke optimal.

3)En af nyere tids stoerste succeser, maalt paa indtjening, er Viagra. Det er ingen hemmelighed hvordan produktet fremstilles, og hvis det ikke var for patentet, ville du sikkert kunne spare en skilling naeste gang du skal paa apoteket.
Det er klart at ingen ville kunne opbygge et produktionsapparat paa en uge. Men de samme produktionsanlaeg kan producere forskellige typer medicin eftersom de overordnede processer er meget lig hinanden. Desuden koebes en lang raekke af ”ingredienserne” hos underleverandoerer, hvilket forkorter opstartsfasen yderligere. Har du opskriften paa et simpelt medicin, tager det faa maaneder at producere eksempelvis Viagra. Din antagelse om at det altid tager 1-2 aar er simpel og forkert.

4) At du i din kommentar vedr. afkast undlader at inddrage risiko, viser at du ikke er helt dus med hvad det her drejer sig om. At sammenligne en enkelt dansk medicinal virksomheds investeringsafkast med det gennemsnitlige industrielle afkast er i sandhed absurd og naivt.


Indsat af Peter Garnry
Email: din@email.dk
”Du har ret i at en fjernelse af patentordningen vil gøre det mindre attraktivt at investere i medicinudvikling, og derfor vil midler flyttes til mere lukrative investeringer. Klart nok.”

– Ok, så har vi det på det rene.

Hvis du er ligeglad med om der udvikles ny medicin, saa er det fair nok at ville fjerne alt patentbeskyttelse. Da vil den eksisterende medicin blive billigere. Klart nok.

– Jeg er ligeglad. Det er ikke mine præferencer, der skal afgøre om, der skal udvikles ny medicin. Din retorik er typisk for mennesker, der ikke vil acceptere, at udvikling af ny medicin er et gode på lige fod med produktion af stål eller udvikling af nyt software. Medicin er så vigtigt, at vi hellere må skævvride prisfunktionen i markedet og give specielle industrier særlige fordele over andre.

”Dine ovrige betragninger er i bedste fald baseret paa uvidenhed.

1)Man kan ikke se isoleret paa et enkelt succesprodukt. Du er noedt til at inddrage hele virksomheden pipeline af mislykket projekter som ogsaa skal finansieres af de faa ”blockbusters”. Hvis du mindsker indtjenings potentialet for den enkelte blockbuster, saa fjerner du grundlaget for en stor del af den medicinske udvikling.”

– Enig, men ville du have jeg skulle give dig 70 eksempler for at har bevist min sag. Pointen var blot at vise dig, hvor hurtigt nyt medicin akkumulerer driftsmæssigt cashflow og indtjening.

2) Novartis er jo netop producent af medicin efter at patentet er udloebet. Sammenligningen er derfor ikke optimal.

– Jeg er ikke hel med på din kommentar her. Jeg skrev, at Novartis er en kopiproducent og ja ifølge loven kan de først kopiere efter patentets udløb. Derudover nævnte jeg, at hvis du ser på deres pipeline, så vil du se, at dit skræmmebillede omkring tidshorisonten af kopiering er overdrevet. Det tager længere tid at kopiere, producere og sælge produktet end mange antager.

3)En af nyere tids stoerste succeser, maalt paa indtjening, er Viagra. Det er ingen hemmelighed hvordan produktet fremstilles, og hvis det ikke var for patentet, ville du sikkert kunne spare en skilling naeste gang du skal paa apoteket.
Det er klart at ingen ville kunne opbygge et produktionsapparat paa en uge. Men de samme produktionsanlaeg kan producere forskellige typer medicin eftersom de overordnede processer er meget lig hinanden. Desuden koebes en lang raekke af ”ingredienserne” hos underleverandoerer, hvilket forkorter opstartsfasen yderligere. Har du opskriften paa et simpelt medicin, tager det faa maaneder at producere eksempelvis Viagra. Din antagelse om at det altid tager 1-2 aar er simpel og forkert.

– Det er ikke en antagelse! . Jeg har blot set i årsrapporterne fra forskellige kopiproducenter. Og jeg skrev ikke eksplicit at det ALTID tager 1-2 år, men blot at det sikkert ville være perioden du ville have fordelen som firstmover på forskellige markeder – igen det varierer.

4) At du i din kommentar vedr. afkast undlader at inddrage risiko, viser at du ikke er helt dus med hvad det her drejer sig om. At sammenligne en enkelt dansk medicinal virksomheds investeringsafkast med det gennemsnitlige industrielle afkast er i sandhed absurd og naivt.

– Måske skulle du blot læse, hvad jeg skriver. Jeg skrev følgende: Påbegyndelsen af en ny pille er ligesom så mange andre investeringsprojekter en investering, der vil generere et givent cashflow over tid, der derfor skal tilbagediskonteres med en given kalkulationsrente, der er en afvejning af risiko, inflation, skat og tidspreference (renten).
Hvis du lægger mærke til hvad jeg skriver, så vil du se, at jeg skrev, at kalkulationsrenten for investeringsprojektet (medicinen) skal indeholde risiko (risiko kan være mange ting: hård konkurrence fra kopiproducenter, recession i økonomien ved salgsstart, opstartsvanskeligheder etc.)

Til sidst vil jeg blot påpege, at din afvisning af min sammenligning er jeg helt uforstående overfor. Jeg anvender sammenligningen for at vise, hvor grotesk (fordi den er tvangsbaseret) ROIC for medicinalsektoren er i forhold til den generelle industri. Hvis konkurrence fra kopiproducenter på et marked uden patentlovgivning halverede ROIC, så ville medicinalsektoren stadig ligge ca. 3% over det industrielle afkast, der i gennemsnit siden 1970 ifølge Goldman Sachs har været 12,1%. Og dette leder mig videre til en hurtig kommentar:

Hvis vi antager, at en medicinalvirksomhed på et frit marked skal til at overveje om de vil producere en ny pille, hvad foretager de sig så? De anvender en kalkulationsrente for projektet, som er den rente virksomheden kræver på sin investering for at de vil investere. Denne beregning vil på et frit marked skulle tage højde for hård konkurrence fra andre virksomheder efter noget tid og derfor presse marginaler nedad. Givet at den er negativ så investerer de ikke. Det er ret banalt og jeg kan tilføje, at jeg har haft investerings- og finansieringsteori i 2 år nu, så mine betragtninger bygger ikke på uvidenhed.

Problemet for mange mennesker, som jeg også nævnte tidligere er, at de ikke vil acceptere, at udvikling og produktion er et simpelt gode som alle andre goder. Tankegangen lægger i direkte forlængelse af tankegangen om at hospitalservice er et offentligt gode og noget markedet ikke kan frembringe, hvilket er direkte stupid at påstå. Mange mennesker har en eller anden indgroet ide om, at medicin frembringer større værdier for mennesker end andre goder (stål og korn), hvorfor vi skal fremme dette gennem subsidier og patenter. Mange vil samtidig gøre klogt i at læse om hvordan markederne genererede nye produkter gennem langsommelig udvikling tilbage i 1800-tallet før patentlovgivningernes endelig indtog. Her ville det åbenbares, at det er absurd at tro på, at inten ny medicin eller mikrochip ville kunne udvikles hvis ikke man kunne få beskyttet sine produkter (ideer) af staten.

Til sidst vil jeg blot råde dig til at være varsom med at tro, at politiske regulativer muliggør en bedre fordeling af kapital i samfundet. Jeg tror historien tydeligt har vist os, at markedets fordeling af ressourcer er politikernes våben regulering overlegent og til større gavn for mennesket.

Mvh
Peter Garnry


Indsat af Dit navn
Email: din@email.dk
Peter Garnry,

”Til sidst vil jeg blot råde dig til at være varsom med at tro, at politiske regulativer muliggør en bedre fordeling af kapital i samfundet. Jeg tror historien tydeligt har vist os, at markedets fordeling af ressourcer er politikernes våben regulering overlegent og til større gavn for mennesket”

Helt enig. I min optik diskuterer vi ikke omfordeling af goder, men hvorvidt IP kan forvares som et gode, der er omfattet af en hvis grad af ejendomsret/ beskyttelse.
Jeg skal forsoege at underbygge min pointe i det foelgende:

Det er i min optik ingen logik i at IP ikke kan betragtes som et gode. Paastanden om at vaerdien af al information ikke udvandes af at andre bruger den, er ligesaa simpel og fejlagtig som mange af de andre oekonomiske principper man bliver gjort bekendt med paa 1. og 2. aars polit. (Selv de fire grundprincipper holder ikke i virkeligheden, men det kan vi tale om en anden gang).

Hvis man har eneret paa en fremstillingsteknik, opskrift eller lignende er det klart at hvis man kan bevare rettigheden til at producere dette, vil man have et monopol paa dette ene produkt, og skulle der ikke eksistere naevnevaerdige substitutter, vil man have et monopolmarked helt for sig selv. Er et monopol gavnligt for producenten? Yes sir. Taber producenten paa yderligere konkurrence? Yes sir. Er monopoler en god ide. Nope. Saa langt saa godt.

Patenter tildeler ophavspersonen et tidsbegraenset monpol. Og spoergsmaalet er saa om det er ok.

Det er helt sikkert at monopolet udgoer en del af den mulige gevinst som indgaar i investeringsbeslutningen. Naar alle parametre ved projektets begyndelse er omfattet af stor usikkerhed (tid, omkostninger, succes rate, patent-race etc), har reduktioner i det mulige afkast desto stoerre effekt paa viljen til at investere. Saa lang saa godt.

Du har ret i at hvis ingen synes at det er attraktivt at investere i eksempelvis ny medicin, vi saa bare kan producere noget andet og bruge den medicin vi allerede har til raadighed.

Spoergsmaalet er derudover, blot fordi man investerer en mia. kr i udviklingen af et produkt, har man saa saerlige rettigheder i forhold til det produkt, og her er vi for alvor uenige, fordi det mener jeg man har.

Vi taler her om et nyt produkt, som ikke forhindrer nogen i at fortsaette med at bruge alle andre produkter, der tidligere var paa markedet. Der er altsaa ingen der direkte faar taget noget ud af deres indkoebskurv fordi et nyt patent introduceres.

Nogle vil helt sikkert synes at produktet er bedre (Det skal det vaere for at faa et patent). Hvis produktet er unikt, kan det kun goere verden bedre at det introduceres (the more the better), og hvis det er et substitut giver det oeget konkurrence ( the more the better).

Hvis der ikke er nogen der stilles daarligere og nogen stilles bedre da har vi PO. Og det er sjaeldent.

Jeg er ydmyg over for at det er umuligt at fastsaette den optimale loebetid for et patent, men derfra til at sige at patenter er et onde, synes jeg endnu ikke der er gode argumenter for.

Det er bestemt relevant at du har læst nogle årsrapporter og haft undervisning i finansiering. Jeg har også engang læst finansiering, baade paa KU (polit + mat oek) og efterfoelgende i London + en CFA. Jeg er desuden ansvarlig for investeringer af omkring 2,5 mia. kr. i unoterede aktier i Europa, og sidder pt. med adgang til en portefølje på 1000+ europæiske virksomheder, heraf 400+ investeringsprojekter inden for europæisk life science. Jeg er derfor bekendt med at opsaette en simpel investeringskalkyle. Jeg har endda lavet udregninger, som er baseret paa virkligheden og kun ikke kun oplevet scenarier hvor alle parametre stod i eksamens opgavetekst.

Du er derfor meget velkommen til at sende mig et konkret eksempel paa at det har taget nogen 1-2 aar at kopiere et produkt. Da har jeg nemlig noget jeg gerne vil saelge til dem.


Indsat af Preston
Email: finn@e-mailanywhere.com

Bad Behavior has blocked 1369 access attempts in the last 7 days.

© 2012-2017 StephanKinsella.com CC0 To the extent possible under law, Stephan Kinsella has waived all copyright and related or neighboring rights to material on this Site, unless indicated otherwise. In the event the CC0 license is unenforceable a  Creative Commons License Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License is hereby granted.

-- Copyright notice by Blog Copyright