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Kinsella on Liberty Podcast, Episode 179.

Jeff Tucker and I discuss the recent copyright lawsuit over the “Blurred Lines” song by Robin Thicke and Pharrel.

Background and related:

From this post: “In the case of copyright, for example, J.D. Salinger, author of Catcher in the Ryeconvinced U.S. courts to ban the publication of a novel called 60 Years Later: Coming Through the Rye.” And in Canada, when a grocery store in Canada mistakenly sold 14 copies of a new Harry Potter book a few days before its official release, a judge  “ordered customers not to talk about the book, copy it, sell it or even read it before it is officially released at 12:01 a.m. July 16″ (on both cases, see Atlas Hefts: The Sequel!).”

See also: The Patent, Copyright, Trademark, and Trade Secret Horror Files

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Kinsella on Liberty Podcast, Episode 178.

I appeared on Emancipated Humans, with host Luis Fernando Mises (Feb. 24, 2015 episode).

 

Related Writing

Corporate Personhood, Limited Liability, and Double Taxation
In Defense of the Corporation
Legitimizing the Corporation
Causation and Aggression” (with Patrick Tinsley)

See also:

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Kinsella on Liberty Podcast, Episode 177.

This is the sixth of 6 lectures of my 2011 Mises Academy course “Rethinking Intellectual Property: History, Theory, and Economics” (originally presented Tuesdays, Mar. 22-April 26, 2011; discussed on the Mises Blog in Study with Kinsella Online and in Rethinking Intellectual Property: Kinsella’s Mises Academy Online Course). The first lecture may be found in KOL172.

The slides for the first lecture of this course are provided below. The course and other matters are discussed in further detail here. All slides and “suggested readings” for the entire course are provided in the notes for KOL172.

Lecture 6: THE FUTURE; INTEGRATING IP THEORY WITH AUSTRIAN ECONOMICS AND LIBERTARIAN THEORY; PROPOSED REFORMS; IMAGINING A POST-IP WORLD; THE FUTURE OF OPEN VS. CLOSED

SUGGESTED READING MATERIAL

See  the notes for KOL172.

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Kinsella on Liberty Podcast, Episode 176.

This is the fifth of 6 lectures of my 2011 Mises Academy course “Rethinking Intellectual Property: History, Theory, and Economics” (originally presented Tuesdays, Mar. 22-April 26, 2011; discussed on the Mises Blog in Study with Kinsella Online and in Rethinking Intellectual Property: Kinsella’s Mises Academy Online Course). I’ll release the remaining lectures here in the podcast feed in upcoming days. The first lecture may be found in KOL172.

The slides for the first lecture of this course are provided below. The course and other matters are discussed in further detail here. All slides and “suggested readings” for the entire course are provided in the notes for KOL172.

Lecture 5: PROPERTY, SCARCITY, AND IDEAS; EXAMINING RIGHTS-BASED ARGUMENTS FOR IP

SUGGESTED READING MATERIAL

See  the notes for KOL172.

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Kinsella on Liberty Podcast, Episode 175.

This is the fourth of 6 lectures of my 2011 Mises Academy course “Rethinking Intellectual Property: History, Theory, and Economics” (originally presented Tuesdays, Mar. 22-April 26, 2011; discussed on the Mises Blog in Study with Kinsella Online and in Rethinking Intellectual Property: Kinsella’s Mises Academy Online Course). I’ll release the remaining lectures here in the podcast feed in upcoming days. The first lecture may be found in KOL172.

The slides for the first lecture of this course are provided below. The course and other matters are discussed in further detail here. All slides and “suggested readings” for the entire course are provided in the notes for KOL172.

Lecture 4: IP STATUTES AND TREATIES; OVERVIEW OF JUSTIFICTIONS FOR IP; PROPERTY, SCARCITY AND IDEAS; RIGHTS-BASED ARGUMENTS FOR IP: CREATION AS A SOURCE OF RIGHTS

SUGGESTED READING MATERIAL

See  the notes for KOL172.

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Kinsella on Liberty Podcast, Episode 174.

This is the third of 6 lectures of my 2011 Mises Academy course “Rethinking Intellectual Property: History, Theory, and Economics” (originally presented Tuesdays, Mar. 22-April 26, 2011; discussed on the Mises Blog in Study with Kinsella Online and in Rethinking Intellectual Property: Kinsella’s Mises Academy Online Course). I’ll release the remaining lectures here in the podcast feed in upcoming days. The first lecture may be found in KOL172.

The slides for the first lecture of this course are provided below. The course and other matters are discussed in further detail here. All slides and “suggested readings” for the entire course are provided in the notes for KOL172.

Lecture 3: EXAMINING THE UTILITARIAN CASE FOR IP

SUGGESTED READING MATERIAL

See  the notes for KOL172.

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Kinsella on Liberty Podcast, Episode 173.

This is the second of 6 lectures of my 2011 Mises Academy course “Rethinking Intellectual Property: History, Theory, and Economics” (originally presented Tuesdays, Mar. 22-April 26, 2011; discussed on the Mises Blog in Study with Kinsella Online and in Rethinking Intellectual Property: Kinsella’s Mises Academy Online Course). I’ll release the remaining lectures here in the podcast feed in upcoming days. The first lecture may be found in KOL172.

The slides for the first lecture of this course are provided below. The course and other matters are discussed in further detail here. All slides and “suggested readings” for the entire course are provided in the notes for KOL172.

Lecture 2: OVERVIEW OF JUSTIFICATIONS FOR IP; PROPERTY, SCARCITY, AND IDEAS

SUGGESTED READING MATERIAL

See  the notes for KOL172.

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Kinsella on Liberty Podcast, Episode 172.

This is the first of 6 lectures of my 2011 Mises Academy course “Rethinking Intellectual Property: History, Theory, and Economics” (Tuesdays, Mar. 22-April 26, 2011; discussed on the Mises Blog in Study with Kinsella Online and in Rethinking Intellectual Property: Kinsella’s Mises Academy Online Course). I’ll release the remaining lectures here in the podcast feed in upcoming days.

The slides for the first lecture of this course are provided below, as are the “suggested readings” for the course. The course and other matters are discussed in further detail here. I also include in this first of the 6 podcasts for this series an introductory video for the course followed by the audio and slides for all 6 lectures. The “suggested readings” for each lecture are appended to the end of this post. I’ll include individual audio and slides for the following podcasts in this series.

Introductory video from the Mises Blog post Kinsella Can Be Your Professor:

Lecture 1: INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY IN HISTORY

Lecture 2: OVERVIEW OF JUSTIFICATIONS FOR IP; PROPERTY, SCARCITY, AND IDEAS [click to continue…]

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KOL171 | With Albert Lu Discussing Stossel and IP

Kinsella on Liberty Podcast, Episode 171.

I was a guest yesterday (Feb. 6, 2015) on Albert Lu’s “The Economy” podcast, discussing my recent appearance on Stossel. The full episode is here; the portion including only our interview is included in this podcast feed.

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Unpublished Letter to The Economist on Inflation, and others

Three letters-to-the-editor I wrote in the 1980s/90s that were never published are here, and repixeled below: on on inflation; one on gambling prohibition; one on free will (nature vs. nurture).

To The Economist (Nov. 11, 1992)

Editor, Letters Page
The Economist Newspaper
25 St James’s Street
London SWlA 1HG
England

Dear Sir:

In “Zero Inflation: How Low is Low Enough?” (November 7th) you assume that governments ought to pursue a low, stable price inflation rate in order to best benefit their economies. In a growing economy, however, a zero price inflation rate would require inflation of the money supply, which itself adversely affects market behaviour. Money inflation artificially lowers interest rates, sending false signals which cause malinvestments and temporary booms. These malinvestments must, ultimately, be liquidated by recession. Thus, the business cycle is born.

The “ideal” rate of price inflation is thus whatever rate—probably a mild deflation—accompanies a zero money inflation rate. In short, in order to avoid price inflation and harmful market disturbances, government should quit printing more money altogether.

Very truly yours,
N. Stephan Kinsella
Houston, Texas [click to continue…]

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KOL170: Tom Woods Show: Are Corporations Unlibertarian?

Kinsella on Liberty Podcast, Episode 170.

Episode 325 of the Tom Woods Show: Are Corporations Un-Libertarian?

From Tom’s show notes (with a few additions from me):

Corporations aren’t people, say protestors. Corporations are creatures of the state, say some libertarians. Is there any merit to these complaints? Should libertarians support the corporate form or not? That’s the topic of discussion on today’s episode, with guest Stephan Kinsella.

Related Writing by the Guest

Corporate Personhood, Limited Liability, and Double Taxation
In Defense of the Corporation
Legitimizing the Corporation
Causation and Aggression” (with Patrick Tinsley)

[See also:

]

Book by the Guest

Against Intellectual Property

Book Mentioned

Robert Hessen, In Defense of the Corporation

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Structural Safeguards to Limit Legislation

In the mid-90s I wrote a couple of law review articles, each which contained a short summary list of possible structural and related changes that could be made (say, to the Constitution) to try to limit state power and to limit the danger of legislation (really, the danger of having a legislature). Ultimately, most such changes are probably futile. Constitutions are paper limits used to prop up state power, and are interpreted and enforced by the very state that is supposed to be limited by it. But they are certainly better than useless measures such as term limits. Probably the single most important of these proposals would be the sunset proposal: every statute expires after some maximum number of years, unless positively reenacted. (For some additional suggestions regarding federalism, see my post Randy Barnett’s “Federalism Amendment”–A Counterproposal.)

The first excerpt is from my article “Legislation and the Discovery of Law in a Free Society,” Journal of Libertarian Studies 11 (Summer 1995):

For all these reasons, I do not believe that legislation is a legitimate or practical means of creating law, or even of patching it. If a legislature can be convinced to recognize and respect the right law, so can a decentralized court system, especially one competing with other courts for customers. Courts do not face the same pernicious and systematic incentives that legislators do to make bad laws, and many of them. And courts, if they go bad, at least have a more limited effect on society; whereas when legislatures go bad, there is no end to the evil that they can perpetrate.[1]

If legislation can be considered valid at all (given a governmental system), it can only be occasional or spurious legislation that modifies the body of law which is primarily developed by a court-based, decentralized law-finding system. If we must have legislation, several constitutional safeguards should accompany its exercise, to attempt to restrict legislation to a purely secondary role in the formation of law. Certainly, a supermajority,[2] and maybe a referendum, should be required in order to enact any statutes whatever, except perhaps for statutes that repeal prior statutes or that limit governmental power. [click to continue…]

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Kinsella on Liberty Podcast, Episode 169.

I was interviewed today by Daniel Rothschild for his “Live Free, Die Old” Youtube channel. We discussed primarily the fallacious argument that Lockean-libertarian-based property titles are flawed if they are based on conquest or cannot be traced back to the first homesteader.

Background material:

 

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Kinsella on Liberty Podcast, Episode 168.

Jeffrey Tucker Interviews Stephan Kinsella on Samsung-Apple trial, Laissez-Faire Club (Aug. 27, 2012).

Video below.

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