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Kinsella on Liberty Podcast, Episode 182.

In January 2014, Stefan Molyneux (of FreeDomain Radio) and I had a discussion with Harrison Fischberg about the foundation of libertarian ethics. I just realized that I never put this on my podcast feed so—here it is.

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On Selling Immigration Rights

Some fun old LewRockwell.com posts from a while back—which I was reminded of by this recent article: Malta Offers Citizenship and All Its Perks for a Price: “But the residency requirements, meant to make the program more palatable, are only increasing the consternation among critics, who say the program has resulted in the sale of citizenship to the global 0.1 percent.”

Immigration Idea

How about this compromise: we remove all barriers to immigration except one: we charge a fee. I propose we charge somewhere between $1 million and $10 million per family. That way you guarantee you get fairly decent (non-criminal, educated, successful, civil, etc.) quality immigrants.

If, say, 100,000 families (about 400,000 people, say) immigrate per year and pay $1 million each, that’s $100 billion per year.

5:20 pm on September 22, 2004

[click to continue…]

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My Religious and Political Conversions

I’ve explained part of my intellectual progress to libertarianism before,1 On occasion I’m asked about my views on philosophy, Ayn Rand/Objectivism, and religion. So a short précis is in order.

I was born in 1965 in Louisiana and attended private Catholic schools. I a good student, bookish, and loved philosophy and science. I was very interested in religion and was very devout; I was an altar boy for several years. For a while I was reading books on various occult or pseudoscientific topics, e.g. pyramid power, Nostradamus, Chariots of the Gods, how to cast spells, and the like. I never really believed it, I think (though I did try a few spells), but it stoked my imagination, just as Star Wars and sci-fi and novels and comics did. [click to continue…]

  1.  How I Became A LibertarianLewRockwell.com, December 18, 2002; published as “Being a Libertarian” in I Chose Liberty: Autobiographies of Contemporary Libertarians (compiled by Walter Block; Mises Institute 2010). See also The Greatest Libertarian Books. []
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My article New Rationalist Directions in Libertarian Rights Theory, originally published in the Journal of Libertarian Studies in 1996,1 which had previously been translated into Dutch, has now been translated, by João Marcos Theodoro (revisão de Marcos Paulo Silva do Nascimento), into Portugese, as Novas Direções Racionalistas nas Teorias Libertárias do Direito. This article discusses and summarizes Hoppe’s argumentation ethics defense of libertarian rights,2 my complementary estoppel-based defense of rights,3 and related ethical/normative theories. The article served as the initial basis for two Wikipedia pages: discourse ethics and argumentation ethics.

Nowadays, everyone knows me for my IP views, but this is my true interest and passion.

To date, my writing has been translated into fourteen languages.

  1. Vol. 12, No. 2, Fall 1996, pp. 313–26. []
  2. See my Argumentation Ethics and Liberty: A Concise Guide. []
  3. See KOL181 | Tom Woods Show: It Is Impossible to Argue Against Libertarianism Without Contradiction and links collected there. []
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Kinsella on Liberty Podcast, Episode 181.

I discussed argumentation ethics with Tom Woods on his show today:

Ep. 370 It Is Impossible to Argue Against Libertarianism Without Contradiction

Stephan Kinsella discusses the argumentation ethics of Hans-Hermann Hoppe, who argues that only libertarian norms can be argumentatively.
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Tom cleverly chose as the title for the episode a provocative one reminiscent of the bold title of Hoppe’s Liberty article,  “The Ultimate Justification of the Private Property Ethic”  (September 1988).

I’ve discussed it several times in the past in audio and text. See, e.g.:

Update: response by Bob Murphy here: Stephan Kinsella Discusses Argumentation Ethics With Tom Woods. For more: see Defending Argumentation Ethics: Reply to Murphy & Callahan, Anti-state.com (Sept. 19, 2002) (wayback version) (reply to Bob Murphy and Gene Callahan, Hans-Hermann Hoppe’s Argumentation Ethic: A CritiqueAnti-state.com (Sept. 19, 2002; wayback version; more recent version at JLS; Block’s rejoinder); debate discussed in this forum).

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Kinsella on Liberty Podcast, Episode 180.

Jeff Tucker and I discussed IP and my original Against Intellectual Property article. The video can be seen here, and it’s embedded below:

Spreecast is the social video platform that connects people.

Check out Liberty Classics: Against IP on Spreecast.

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Kinsella on Liberty Podcast, Episode 179.

Jeff Tucker and I discuss the recent copyright lawsuit over the “Blurred Lines” song by Robin Thicke and Pharrel.

Background and related:

From this post: “In the case of copyright, for example, J.D. Salinger, author of Catcher in the Ryeconvinced U.S. courts to ban the publication of a novel called 60 Years Later: Coming Through the Rye.” And in Canada, when a grocery store in Canada mistakenly sold 14 copies of a new Harry Potter book a few days before its official release, a judge  “ordered customers not to talk about the book, copy it, sell it or even read it before it is officially released at 12:01 a.m. July 16″ (on both cases, see Atlas Hefts: The Sequel!).”

See also: The Patent, Copyright, Trademark, and Trade Secret Horror Files

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Kinsella on Liberty Podcast, Episode 178.

I appeared on Emancipated Humans, with host Luis Fernando Mises (Feb. 24, 2015 episode).

 

Related Writing

Corporate Personhood, Limited Liability, and Double Taxation
In Defense of the Corporation
Legitimizing the Corporation
Causation and Aggression” (with Patrick Tinsley)

See also:

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Kinsella on Liberty Podcast, Episode 177.

This is the sixth of 6 lectures of my 2011 Mises Academy course “Rethinking Intellectual Property: History, Theory, and Economics” (originally presented Tuesdays, Mar. 22-April 26, 2011; discussed on the Mises Blog in Study with Kinsella Online and in Rethinking Intellectual Property: Kinsella’s Mises Academy Online Course). The first lecture may be found in KOL172.

The slides for the first lecture of this course are provided below. The course and other matters are discussed in further detail here. All slides and “suggested readings” for the entire course are provided in the notes for KOL172.

Lecture 6: THE FUTURE; INTEGRATING IP THEORY WITH AUSTRIAN ECONOMICS AND LIBERTARIAN THEORY; PROPOSED REFORMS; IMAGINING A POST-IP WORLD; THE FUTURE OF OPEN VS. CLOSED

SUGGESTED READING MATERIAL

See  the notes for KOL172.

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Kinsella on Liberty Podcast, Episode 176.

This is the fifth of 6 lectures of my 2011 Mises Academy course “Rethinking Intellectual Property: History, Theory, and Economics” (originally presented Tuesdays, Mar. 22-April 26, 2011; discussed on the Mises Blog in Study with Kinsella Online and in Rethinking Intellectual Property: Kinsella’s Mises Academy Online Course). I’ll release the remaining lectures here in the podcast feed in upcoming days. The first lecture may be found in KOL172.

The slides for the first lecture of this course are provided below. The course and other matters are discussed in further detail here. All slides and “suggested readings” for the entire course are provided in the notes for KOL172.

Lecture 5: PROPERTY, SCARCITY, AND IDEAS; EXAMINING RIGHTS-BASED ARGUMENTS FOR IP

SUGGESTED READING MATERIAL

See  the notes for KOL172.

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